Virtualize Your World

Virtualization?  What is it? Why use it?  These are good questions to ask yourself and your business.  I am not talking about a virtual person or Bitmoji, but servers, desktops, switching and more. While many people think of this as a new technology.  Virtulization got its’ start with large mainframes decades ago, to avoid wasting expensive processing power, it really caught hold in the early 2000s. Before virtualization, servers would run one application on one server with one operating system.  The number of servers would grow depending on how many applications were needed.  This would lead to expensive hardware purchases and very little of the hardware resources used.  On average each server would only use 12 to 15 percent of its resources.   Leaving up to 85 percent of server resources completely unused. Virtualization is possible because of a software layer called a hypervisor.  The hypervisor is used to create “software containers” known as virtual machines (VM).  The virtual machines can be servers with different operation systems or desktops, such as Windows 10.  Every VM created on the hypervisor is separate and operate independently of each other.   Virtualization allows you to run more applications on fewer physical servers thus using resources effectively. In a nutshell virtualization takes the CPU, memory, network and storage of the physical hardware and shares it through the hypervisor to the virtual desktop or server. This technology also lends itself to other capabilities.   High availability, migrating VM’s from one host to another, adding memory and processing power all while the VM is running.  Backups can change from file and folders to having a complete image of...

OPEN WIFI-Free is not safe

Everyone enjoys the open guest network provided by restaurants or other public locations.  Why not jump on and save your precious cell phone data? When you connect to your home Wi-Fi network using a passphrase the traffic between your phone, laptop, or tablet is encrypted.  What that means is even if your neighbor is within range of your Wi-Fi they cannot see the webpages you are viewing. The open nature of the guest network opens you and everyone using it to malicious activity by others.  Generally, these networks are unencrypted.   If you do not need to enter a passphrase to connect to the Wi-Fi most likely it is not encrypted.   Without encryption your wireless traffic is open to everyone to view.   You cannot see this traffic with eyes or special glasses.  Applications like Firesheep is an easy to use tool which allows snooping on open Wi-Fi networks.  There is also an advanced tool called Wireshark to capture and analyze wireless network traffic.  Websites that are available over https versus http will have encryption, as the ‘S” stands for Secure.  The browser extension HTTPS Everywhere can help with this by redirecting to encrypted pages. One of the ways attackers trick people is by using a honeypot network.  This is where they create an open Wi-Fi network that tricks people into thinking they are connected to a public Wi-Fi network.  It is actually their own network created to steal information from your device. Protect yourself by not doing online banking or accessing sensitive data on an open wi-fi network.  Use https pages only while using open Wi-Fi networks.  If you are...

Talk To Me

Machine to machine (M2M) is a broad label that can be used to describe any technology that allows network devices to communicate without manual assistance of humans. Much of M2M today is used for remote monitoring. For example the Coke machine can tell the vendor what is needed for the next delivery or to tell the power and water company your meter readings. M2M uses Wi-Fi, cellular, RFID, to communicate to a software program to read the data and make decisions. Many of the devices today labeled as “smart” are using the M2M communication capabilities. Industrial robots are using the M2M communication to send errors for correction during production. Future endeavors of M2M is in the vehicle industry. What if your car knew about the car next to you and in front of you on the interstate? It would know when they get to close or brake hard and could react without you touching the brake. In fact the United States Department of Transportation announced this it is proposing a rule to require vehicle-to-vehicle communication technology in new cars. One problem with M2M as of now is there is no standard. Many vendors are creating proprietary communications between devices. Vendors will need to agree upon standards for device-to-device communications. With devices communicating on their own, they can tell you when to change the oil in your car, order food and help keep you safe on the road. What will machine-to-machine do for you in the future? Scott Young – Network/Server...